student gallery

2017 High School Winners

Angelika Kołodziej

2017 • High
Gold Award
reflection >

Reading about ocean pollution created some emotional, dark images in my head. I felt like I have to take a photograph of my imagination to make people care, so that they will try to help, not damage, our ocean.

I reflected on our future. The old man, covered in gold and wealth stands for the rich, careless people. He contaminated the earth, selfishly overused energy, threw rubbish away, set up more and more factories, built walls between him and the nature. His misdeeds contributed to global warming. The glaciers started to melt, taking the polar bears’ home away. Debris made animals sick, sea level rose, and the incredibly polluted ocean started to deluge the land. The old man, having realised that it’s all his fault, helplessly climbed the ladder and let the ocean surround him. Do we really want to be that old man? So let’s start helping, not destroying. Let’s give our ocean a better future!

 

Neha Patel

2017 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

When researching for information for this contest, there was one subject that popped out to me – penguins in sweaters. Although it is the most adorable thing, why would penguins wear sweaters? It turns out there is a deeper story behind this. Penguins have been suffering from the effects of oil spills across the globe and penguin sweaters have been the solution to this. To prevent the penguins from ingesting the lethal oil and gunk on their bodies, the penguins wear sweaters. The sweaters have risen in popularity ever since an oil spill in Australia’s Phillip Island where 32,000 penguins were put at risk. Such a simple solution has transformed the effects of oil spills for the better good.

My artwork is symbolic of the sweaters and the act of knitting. The power is in our hands. The future is in our hands. My artwork depicts a girl knitting a heart with three penguins in her lap. Two of the penguins are protected, wearing cozy sweaters. The middle penguin, however, is covered in oil and looking up for help. The act of knitting symbolizes the power in our hands. We, the people, hold ultimate power over these penguin’s lives. We must “knit” together love and offer solace to penguins in return for our unruly mistakes in the ocean waters. Just as the girl is knitting together a heart, we must knit together our actions. The background of the artwork states “knitting the future, one penguin at a time”. The future is in our hands and we MUST take action, whether it be through knitting, or simple acts of kindness, to reform the effects of oil spills.

Gwen Wodark

2017 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Our society depends on all of Earth’s features: the land, water, atmosphere, etc., though we do not show our appreciation for them. Development over time with new machines and new ways, many of them cause a harmful amount of pollution.

My watercolor expresses that our people and culture are infecting our ocean every day purely for our own benefit. The ocean begins fresh and clean, but then as we develop, only thinking for ourselves, the ocean starts to lose its biodiversity and become infected. As the ocean tries to break free we hold on tightly, we need it to survive. In the end, a more green and sustainable way is resolved by us and it cooperates with the ocean. The air pollution causes ocean acidification. This affects the coastal areas significantly by slowly killing off coral reefs, fish, and others. By continuing our ways it will only cause us to lose Earth’s valuable resources.

If we are to expand our ideas it needs to be clean for us and the earth, a win-win. The last hand gesture you can see that the earth has become greener and the water is back to its original state. This can only result from having a more sustainable way of living, the pollution needs to stop. Also, there are no fish in this image. Even if we alter our ways, it doesn't mean that we can always get everything back. By not acting soon, things that are needed for survival could be diminished. The ocean is a prime resource that we need to survive, so we need to start acting like it is.

Grace Alter

2017 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Unknown to many, the microfibers from our clothing are poisoning the ocean. Fabrics like fleece, spandex, nylon and polyester are made from plastic. When we wash our clothing, these microfibers go into the water and ultimately end up in the ocean. This is harming marine life via two mechanisms: physical blockages and chemical poisoning. Once swallowed, these irregularly shaped particles stay inside the fish and the chemicals leach into its body. This also has significant ramifications for humans who eat fish.

This artwork consists of an organically formed skirt of generous proportions, juxtaposed with a stark geometric and rigid embroidered top. It highlights how a small act of choosing clothing made from non-natural materials can have a destructive impact on the ocean. The puddle of fabric at the bottom of the skirt directly links the artwork to the ocean theme. The animated fish swimming over the skirt illustrates the way in which marine creatures involuntary swim in the microfibers of our clothing.

The choice of materials comments on the way in which the dress, that looks so beautiful and seemingly harmless, can actually be detrimental to other creatures. Neutral and white hues are intended to emphasize this innocence. The use of the ancient art of embroidery highlights the disruption of an environment that has been around for longer than we humans have.
The artwork aims to raise awareness of a seemingly simple, unknown yet severe act with the intention of evoking change.

Isabella Hollis

2017 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it” — Robert Swan

When we think of major ocean pollution, we think of oil spills and industrial run-off. There is little that the average person can do to reduce this. However, a more intimate problem occurs. The small scale, causal litter we see from citizens like you and I everyday can easily be avoided by simple acts of conscientious effort. It takes more than a federal regulation to clean up our act. It's up to us as citizens and caretakers of this world to individually make the effort to reduce the waste in our environment and encourage it to grow healthy again. In my piece, I gave perspective on the depths of the ocean in order to prompt the viewer to think critically about their own rule in pollution. In order for a change to happen, one must first raise awareness of the problem and then educate as many people as they can reach. Through my work I hope to reach out to people that I would never have gotten the opportunity to reach out to otherwise. Hopefully this will inspire fresh support to our cause of reducing and eventually eliminating pollution.

Sharon Yoo

2017 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Waste is being put into the ocean constantly due to human advancement. We have been putting this conflict aside thinking that we could excuse ourselves from dealing with this struggle. However, as humans keep ignoring it and acting as if nothing is occurring, many living organisms in the marine life are being swept away and affected tremendously.
In my artwork, I wanted to depict the afterwards impact of ocean pollution to the whole world.

Through this piece, I wanted to demonstrate the confined feeling that both the human species and life within the ocean would feel. The hands are symbolically displaying the prisoners’ emotions of being jailed and trapped, and the background adds on to this message. The fish are not yet infected, being shown with vibrant colors, while on the other hand, they are connected to the human rib cage. This shows that pollution is not just an easy conflict we could just pass by and that it could have horrendous effects. As trash infects and influences organisms in the ocean, we are being affected at the same time through the things we eat; just like a cycle, eventually polluting us. I wanted to spread awareness through this artwork and inform people that individuals can contribute to this matter by even a small action in their daily lifestyle.

Jack Chen

2017 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

The basic theme of my work is the situation that involves plastic soda rings and marine life. These seemingly harmless pieces of plastic actually can cause a lot of damage to sea animals, because they can get caught into one and forever have a plastic ring around their necks, even their entire bodies as they grow bigger. This is terrible because it can hinder breathing or growth and basically give these poor animals a miserable life. I represent this idea by making the soda rings act as hand cuffs for these “prisoners.” I depict these animals as prisoners by having them line up, wear orange uniforms, and have a fence blocking them off from their real homes. Hopefully my work will spread awareness for not pollution the water with garbage, and also for people to actively prevent the injury of sea animals by tiny actions such as cutting up a soda ring before throwing it out.

Hannah Jones

2017 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

Coral reefs are living breathing homes to more than twenty-­five percent of marine life. Fish, snails, clams, sponges, sea stars, marine worms, sharks, and turtles are all examples of creatures that depend on the reef. Coral reefs even benefit humans, providing protection from storms, food for local fisherman, and tourism. Unfortunately, human actions threaten these beneficial creatures. Carbon dioxide emissions are the greatest contributors to reef degradation, causing global temperatures to rise and the oceans to become more acidic. Rising temperatures can cause a phenomenon known as coral bleaching. Bleaching is a sign that the coral is struggling to survive. Affected corals lose their color, leaving them ghosts of their former grandeur.

I was inspired by the Great Barrier Reef and its transformation from vibrant to monochrome. The corals’ skeletal appearance reminded me of the destruction humans can cause if we do not change our ways. I used paper to illustrate the fragility and intricate beauty of this ocean wonder. As the corals fade in color, marine life disappears. I learned to appreciate each coral’s form through hours of meticulous paper-cutting. I hope my work inspires you to discover more about coral reefs and consider how our actions on land impact our seas.

Yoojin Lee

2017 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

Pollution is one of the major social issues in the world. Even though people know that pollution affects our economy, people are not fully aware and warned how much harm it will bring to our society. Marine debris and plastic pollution harms our daily lives, but especially our environment. Our minor habits such as littering cause pollution to the ocean. In my painting, I want to portray that trashes and debris overcome humans due to the large amounts, which will eventually come together and shape into the form of a human’s body. The man is wearing a gas mask, because I wanted to portray that marine pollution is harmful and fatal to our environment. People should be more aware and know the consequences that could occur if marine pollution continues. All of us should start to be aware and make small changes to make our world better and cleaner.

Madison Miller

2017 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

From the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to the general flotsam and jetsam that you’ll find along the coastline, our waste has far-reaching and devastating effects. Broken fishing lines cause ghost fishing, loose plastic bags suffocate sea life, and oil spills wipe out entire habitats. In my painting, I wanted to juxtapose the delicate and graceful nature of the jellyfish with the muck and filth floating inside of it; a collusion between life and death. Pollution does not enhance nature; rather, it diminishes and destroys it. What would otherwise be pristine and abundant is corrupted and can no longer sustain its natural assets. I believe in making art that means something –that catalyzes change, tells a story, and makes a statement. My piece draws attention to the pestilential nature of pollution through its imagery and form, and seeks out a visceral response from the viewer.

Amy Pan

2017 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

We are descendants of the ocean. What we do to it, whether good or bad, will eventually return to us and our future generations. However, studies have shown that over 70% of the population remain indifferent on the topic of marine pollution, because they couldn’t see a connection between such damage and the well-being of themselves. To raise awareness on marine pollution, I chose to create this artwork focusing on two popular concerns—marine debris and sewage. I took a direct approach, by personifying our ocean as a helpless mother, with the baby in her arms representing us—yes, not any random baby, but every single one of us. The untouched umbilical cord and the mud on the baby’s body, symbolizes how innocent babies suffered from our contaminated ocean, even before he opened his eyes. Finally, the clear waves in the background represent our past— and our future if we start changing. Now, think twice, who are the victims of ocean pollution? For those who don’t care, try imagining a life without fresh water—imagine drinking from water mixed with plastic and foam bits; having to take baths in foul-smelling sewage; spending your favorite vacation on a beach full of garbage… You might think this is distant from you, but it’s actually not that far away if we don’t change what we’re currently doing to our ocean bodies. Do not let ignorance murder our future generations. If you care, take action—right now.

Claire Donnelly

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

My idea for this project was to create a mixed media artwork that shows a turtle swimming through waste, except over the years’ pollution has gradually increased creating a serious problem for humanity and the earth. So, I decided to create a timeline to show the increase in pollution over the years. I picked glass because it is made from sand which is recycling. It is thick in volume which creates a blue/ green colour similar to oceans. I chose engraving with a dermal tool because it is a medium that I have never done before and was very interested in. It creates a three-dimensional effect on the glass which creates a reflection.

My first idea was to place the glass in a line but then I soon realised that the viewer would not see the movement or the increase in pollution well enough, so I decided to place them in a circle to create a timeline. The circle represents the earth, ocean, turtle swimming, and timeline. The base/thick board represents the earth. The resin represents the ocean. I picked this resin because I wanted something clear and firm to keep the glass upright and stable. I chose ice-like LED lights because they give a dramatic effect and it helps notice the engraving lines of the turtles. I am naming my artwork ‘Turtle Decrease’ because the number of turtles dying from pollution is heart breaking.

Nina Gabriel

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

What really threatens the ocean? The animals that live in it and call it home, or is it us who mindlessly throw toxins in it. When I first heard the prompt I already knew I wanted to use oil spills, however I didn’t know exactly what my subject would be. I wanted to use something I knew well, something timeless that people could recognize. Then I remembered Moby Dick, the legendary white whale. I remember when I was little and I watched a cartoon on it I actually felt bad for the whale. I always wondered why he was furious with humans. Maybe humans started taking all his food, or killed his family off. I just always saw him as misunderstood, instead of a manifestation of evil that the characters in the book viewed him as. To me the humans in the story did more damage to the ocean, which connects back to the pollution topic. Almost all the issues on the contest list can trace back to human hands. Thus my idea was born, Moby Dick (who symbolizes nature) vs. Pollution. I decided to use a dark oil spill to contrast with the whale’s pure white skin, to create a grimmer look. I was inspired by some vintage illustrations for the composition. In the border I also tied marine debris in with pictures of fish bones and factories. The message on the piece is to evoke responsibility for the ocean’s destruction, and change in our actions.

Yukhei Ho

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

We humans are blessed to be able to choose where we want to live, but the plastic products that have been littered into the ocean have forced these sea animals to unwillingly choose their homes and to settle in man-made plastic products.

The words “Sweet Home” imply the homes that are destroyed as a result of the plastic pollution that has been created by man. Sea creatures have no choice but to accept mankind’s plastic as their “new” home. Others may perceive this poster to show how the sea creatures, big or small, are tangled or mistakenly eat these plastic products.

Eun Lee

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

I used to love a certain face wash with microbeads. The scrubbing sensation felt amazing on my face. That was until I read an article that horrified me: microbeads are actually tiny pieces of plastic that get washed down my drain and ultimately find their way into the ocean, where they are damage the environment, hurt sea life, and threaten human health. According to the United Nations Environmental Program, microplastics are used in a shockingly wide range of products: deodorant, shampoo, conditioner, shower gel, lipstick, hair colouring, shaving cream, sunscreen, insect repellent, anti-wrinkle creams, moisturizers, hair spray, facial masks, baby care products, eye shadow, and mascara.

For my entry, I wanted to come up with something that could get many teenagers to do something positive for the environment. I wanted something simple that anyone could put to action. So I focused on discouraging people to stop buying products with microbeads. My parody advertisement points out the truth about microbeads for those who might not know it. Through light humor, the piece educates without sounding like a lecture, something very important for appealing to teenagers. If this would come up on someone’s Instagram timeline, I really think they would avoid products with microbeads. It’s something simple enough for any one person to do, but through the power of social media, I think it could spread well and potentially have a massive impact.

Jessica Li

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

I created this piece as a part of my concentration which focuses on the journey of a sea turtle and advocates for ocean conservation. Inspired by a research expedition in the Bahamas, this piece depicts a sea turtle as it faces the human-induced challenge of ocean pollution. Fishing hooks and longlines manage to trap not only the fish desired, but also endangered species of sharks, whales, and sea turtles. In this painting, a generous sea turtle acts as a good samaritan, attempting to release a whale entangled in a fishing net. However, it is to no avail. The turtle and the whale are painted in bright blue colors, while a harsh black line of ink interrupts the flow of the ocean. By polluting the ocean with garbage and fishing equipment, we are creating a battle between humans and the ocean with all its marine life.

Zhaoyu Liu

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

We all have a common homeland--Earth. This is the place we live and laugh together. However, a cold-blooded killer gradually destroys this peace: water pollution. As society becomes more developed, a great many relentless factories pollute our environment. All the poisonous chemicals, metals, and sewage were poured into our lovely rivers, and ocean. Fish are crying, losing their livable habitat. As one part of the earth, I realize it is time to do something for our planet! I decided to take out my art tools, and make a painting to rouse people’s souls and help them gain their consciousness of protecting our ocean.

The painting was made by color pencil and watercolor. The girl in this painting is the guardian of the ocean. She is trying to hold the fish in her hand to tell all the people that it is time to use our hands to protect theses animals instead of destroying their homeland. The serious greenhouse effect is leading to the melting of ice and rising of the sea level. The melting ice cubes in the painting represent the rising ocean temperature. The falling ice cubes tells us we have to make a move to stop the ice from melting. The pattern behind the girl is a star inside a circle. It represents connection, and tells us that protecting our earth is not a job done by one person. Instead, everyone in the earth should work together to reduce the pollution and make our earth better.

 

Man Hei Miranda Mo

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

The digital illustration portrays a Chinese girl lifting up her blanket to discover ocean pollution as the real monster under her bed. As a Chinese myself, issues in my country fuel my art. I chose to render my piece digitally to parallel how environmental concerns are as current and pervasive as technology is in our lives. In this piece, China's oceans are, like other countries, polluted by plastic bottles, bags, and tin cans. However, unconventionally, one of the debris is a dead pig, which is inspired by the 2013 incident in Pinghu when 16,000 diseased pig carcasses were disposed illegally into the Huangpu river. Moreover, the pipes discharge red wastewater like the factories in Wenzhou in 2014, intoxicating the river and subsequently acidifying the ocean. Thick algae also flows out of the drawer, similar to the algae-filled coastlines in Qingdao. As a result, these contaminated water sources have endangered locals' lives and depleted fish populations. Unlike the photoshopped advertisements, water pollution cannot be covered and will constantly be revealed. Unlike the imaginary monsters, ocean acidification is a reality. Unlike how we grow out of the monsters under our beds, environmental issues will always persist unless we fix them. By actively participating in local beach cleanups or environmental research and advocacy, we must ensure a healthier and safer future not only for ourselves, but also for our planet.

Becky Ni

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Ocean pollution is caused by various factors including oil spills, nuclear waste and sewage. However, I want to find a way to save the ocean on a daily basis. While I was conducting research, I found that a person uses a plastic bag on average for only 12 minutes. In the meantime, we only recycle 1 plastic bag in every 200 we use. Each year, 500 billion to 1 trillion plastic bags are estimated to be consumed worldwide, meaning that one million are consumed per minute. A very large portion of these used plastic bags end up in the ocean, causing deaths of thousands of marine mammals who ingest plastic or get entangled in them.

My painting shows a person carrying a plastic bag. The plastic bag represents the ocean and a sea turtle is trapped inside. A plastic bag is stuck on its head making it the bag’s victim. The person is the injurer since the person is the consumer of the bag. Dead coral reefs, fish bones and more plastic bags lie on the ocean floor, showing how seriously the ocean is damaged. Finally, the background is full of people carrying fabric bags, showing the solution for saving our ocean.

Juš Pustoslemšek

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

My work is showing the other face of our industry. The face fueled by money, greed and ignorance and is runing and sea life and oceans in general. The first represents the doom of sea creatures and is meant as a reflection of the factories.

Jade Wang

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Climate change is an extremely relevant societal issue, but with the United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Agreement, it appears that the challenge of defeating worldwide climate change is becoming more daunting. I decided to explore one aspect of environmental damage: ocean pollution. In my piece, the scenes that fill the frame of the distorted human body are the events that make up who we are: our memories. There are scenes of love, friendship, and more, all among the clean ocean of the past. However, the person is drowning and dying. Humanity is causing death, not only its own death, but also the environment’s death. Due to our ignorance, future generations won’t be able to enjoy the same luxuries we enjoy. The distorted body represents the guiltiness the person has for living selfishly—it symbolizes and foreshadows humanity’s fate in the future if we don’t change our ways.

Nicole Zapata

2017 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Oceans are really amazing ecosystems. They have lots of biodiversity in them and many mysteries. This is the idea that everyone has of the oceans, but when people face reality they see that not everything is as perfect as it seems. The great idea of the ocean has been decreasing because of contamination. In my piece we can see how humans and the oceans need to be one and work together for the benefit of both, since humans started contaminating this ecosystem, humans are the ones that need to take care of it. We need to take action now and reduce the damage that oceans are suffering, before it gets worst. The colors of the picture mix with each other to show unity, and the ocean and the body of the women join together to form just one figure. The girl is looking to the ocean; this represents how sometimes we can clearly see the problems and damage to the ecosystems, but do nothing to stop the problem. Finally, above the girl we can see a cave, it represents how sometimes we are so closed in our thoughts and in our perspective that we can’t see what is around us, the benefits that it gives us but the damage we are causing to it. 

Alex Barnes

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

I love my coastline. While it may technically not be an ocean, Lake Michigan looks endless from Chicago shores. Unfortunately, as do the heaps of forgotten Starbucks cups, takeout containers, sunscreen bottles, plastic bags, etc. -- leading me to the driving force behind my piece. Further inspiration came from the statistic released by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation: By 2050, we will have as much plastic in our oceans as fish. My piece is a fictional representation of what a plastic ocean might look like, imagining the plastic actually replacing our fish instead of killing them as it likely actually would. I want viewers to see these plastic cups -- items which they have all used and have probably littered with at least once -- and relate themselves to ocean pollution and its catastrophic consequences.

Julie Guellec

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

I created the piece “Emerging” in order to depict the troubling guilt people have been undergoing due to the human influence on the deterioration of the ocean. Throughout the last few decades our oceans have been experiencing a drastic increase in pollution of all sort, a proliferation so high that the situation seems almost hopeless. In this piece, I have represented this hopelessness with a human subject struggling for a breath of air, meaning that although it may be difficult to clean up the mess we have imposed on our oceans, there is a solution and it must be carried out. The confusion that comes with these issues is represented through the troubled waters visible in my piece. Another aspect within this piece with a prominent meaning is the koi fish, in this case symbolizing the unknown solution to the situation, which is associated with a spark of hope. I decided to incorporate this particular fish due to its energetic life force demonstrated by its ability to swim against currents and travel upstream. Some cultural characteristics include success, courage, ambition and perseverance, which are key characteristics activists and the rest of the world need to embody if we want to save our oceans.

Alexandra Hinkle

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Ever since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill devastated the waters off of our coast in Louisiana, I’ve become more and more aware and irked about the damage we as a race have contributed to our oceans. The ocean is one of, if not the, most important biome on the planet, providing most of the food and oxygen available. It is filled with vast diversity and uncharted mysteries, but instead of working to understand and protect it, it appears that we have decided to tarnish it. It’s easy enough for most people to do—the majority of people never see the ocean save for specific cleaned beaches catering to the vacationing.

For this piece, I decided to scavenge the nearby shore for trash, collecting items as an accurate reference of what there is polluting the seas. I then superimposed the drawing of the garbage with a drawing of a fish, half-alive in clear water, half-dead from the trash and oil. I wanted to juxtapose the two, clean and graceful marine life with a dead and rotting corpse from the waste. The contrast is meant to be jarring, so that it can illustrate just how devastating human trash is to the ocean and all of the creatures that live there.

Filip Levec

2017 • High
Honorable Mention

Qinlin Li

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

I think there are several factors that led to my passion for, and involvement in, sustainability but I think my community has been my greatest impact, particularly my home country of China, and my own family’s involvement in and concern regarding pollution and sustainability. As a resident of China for the majority of my life, I have read about and seen firsthand how the environment has been polluted by the irresponsible behavior of people. I became interested in sustainability, hoping to do my part to raise sustainability awareness; reducing my own waste of single-use products, reusing and recycling paper, and modeling so others would do the same. I think my small family environment has also influenced me on my engagement in this realm. My father’s company recycles methane emitted from coal mines and turns it into electricity. Influenced by his work, I also wish to contribute my efforts into doing my part to help in preserving the environment. As a result of these influences, I decided to learn more about plastic manufacturing and pollution when I was thinking of a background for my first studio assignment this year.

Plastics are ubiquitous and while they provide convenience to our lives, they are an infamous source of pollution. Unlike other materials, plastics never break down, so all the plastic products we use and produce stay with us forever. After they are used, they are abandoned everywhere, on the beaches, by the streets, and so on, and they not only become undesirable scenes, they can also contribute to the plastic gyre that would bring them to other formerly pristine areas. Plastic pollution is a critical problem because it ruins the earth, and animals accidentally perceive plastics as food. Many appalling photographs and reports depict dead animals filled with plastic products inside their dead bodies.

Through my artwork, I wish to raise an awareness of the threat of irresponsible plastic usage and inspire others to reduce their use of these synthesized materials. The piece entitled “Friends” is a piece in response to two articles that I read this year. One of them states that researchers found microplastic particles in every water sample they obtained, and the other shows how plastics are impacting and killing Laysan albatross. In my drawing, the plastic balls in the background symbolize enlarged versions of microplastic beads, constituting the habitat of these ocean-dependent birds. The toy duck demonstrates human involvement in pollution in the oceans, interrupting the ecosystem.

 

 

Sophie Naylor

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

While driving along the 101 into Santa Barbara, I was stunned when I saw multiple enormous oil rigs dotting the coast. This was the first time I became concerned about the effects of oil rigs on the ocean environment. I found that their presence is a constant worry, for if one explodes or leaks like the 2010 oil spill, its impact can be devastating. With so many rigs losing so much oil, it is a constant threat to ocean life.

I decided to paint an oil rig piercing a heart, to symbolize how our damage so far on the ocean has impacted its beauty and purity. The skull and crossbones imbedded into the oil rig stands for symbol for poison, as the oil rig can symbolize a wide range of ways we poison our oceans. Under the surface of the water, we see the real problem where this contamination punctures the heart of the sea made of ocean animals.

Although this piece represents the impact of our decisions on the earth’s oceans, it also ignites our power to fight and choose to protect our oceans. We must inform others how our choices impact ocean life and how we cannot let people be ignorant of their actions. I hope that others will have a change of heart and put thought into the effects our force can have on the ocean environment. So let’s step up and educate others to preserve the heart of the sea!

Emmanuel Ramirez

2017 • High
Honorable Mention

Walter Shen

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

In the news there often are unfortunate events of pollution: not only of air pollution, but that of the ocean as well. Be it garbage or oil, the classic image of a bird choking on a soda 6-pack ring is all too clichéd. My drawing highlights both human filthy trash floating in water in the foreground, and disgusting rainbow oil rings in the background. Using colored pencil and ink, I created a very dirty duck that pulls a paper boat filled with little sea creatures desperate for help to safety. It should not be the duck’s duty to save these animals from our harm. It should be our duty to save these creatures, before the harm hurts us too. Ocean pollution makes me feel unsatisfied with the amount of effort we humans have on behalf of the seas. I support nature awareness to prevent us from doing more harm on the earth.

Gordon Su

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

In creating this piece, I sought to strike a contrast between the effects of pollution and some of the solutions to these problems. Specifically, I depicted sewage runoff, oil spills, and trash dumping, major sources of pollution plaguing our oceans today. On the other side of the drawing, some of the solutions to the aforementioned problems are presented. I drew people collecting trash from a beach and the ocean. At the bottom is a vibrant coral reef. An average person may not be able to make significant contributions to the mitigation of ocean pollution, but instilling an anti-littering ethos will undoubtedly benefit the environment, both on land and in our oceans. After all, much of the pollution in the ocean begins on land.  The drawing is centered around a globe. The globe is split in two, in order to represent the disparity in the outcomes of pollution and anti-pollution efforts. On the left side of the globe, the detrimental consequences of pollution are shown, including a lack of vegetated land and discoloration in the color of the ocean water. On the right side, an idealistic earth is shown, with a bright green foliage cover and deep blue oceans. The ocean is a vast frontier covering seventy percent of our planet's surface, yet it will soon be irreparably contaminated if we fail to act more sustainably.

Estella Tian

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Each time when I think of ocean pollution, I see a fish in my mind struggling in water surrounded by garbage. Just like I what I express in my artwork, a fish is trapped by a net full of plastic wastes, metal cans and toxic batteries. Although this trash is inevitable from human daily life, it can easily lead to the deaths of fishes through the human action of throwing these waste on the beach or directly into the ocean. In other words, we can save thousands of marine lives simply by picking up trash on the beach and if possible in the ocean. Above the net, there is a scene of factory chimneys releasing industrial waste by a sea, and the water is muddy and dirty. This further implies that it is imminent for us to take actions to stop endangering marine organism. At this moment, a fish is crying for help. If each of us give it a hand, more lives can be saved. It is our decision. I am ready to save lives. ARE YOU READY?

Lulu Tian

2017 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Hearing of this contest, I was excited to express my frustration concerning ocean pollution, especially the careless actions causing debris/plastic pollution and oil spills. I wish for a world where people are fully aware of the consequences of their actions and how to address them.

I painted the ocean with vivid colors to convey hope for the ocean’s future. However, the flailing fish and the orange (acidic) pH strip transition into the devastation and waste portrayed by the black and white wave. The beauty of the ocean is juxtaposed with the pollution caused by humans. I illustrated the waste in mainly black and white to contrast the beautiful ocean with its antagonists. The splashes of color solidify the waste’s connection to the ocean, and the undertones of dripping oil reminds the viewer of how prominent the issue is. The seabird drenched in oil is unable to escape from the waste, which it is chained to, and it overlooks the entire painting, helpless.

I contrasted the relaxed people made of smog with the transparent figure in the ocean lifting up the pollution to display two routes: we can either become a product of the pollutants of society, or learn to understand and cooperate with the ocean. An “easy” smog-like life is not the solution for ocean pollution.

Instead of simply riding the wave, we have the power to control the waves we make. So let’s raise them to new heights of awareness and responsibility.

Nour Abedrabbo

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Art is a graceful ability of humanity. It provides and expresses freedom, the human mind and senses are able to roam. With art we are able to see a diversity of mindsets which leads to the capability to understand each other. I'd like to use my art to improve and advance awareness to world issues, especially environmental issues. My work contains four panels that each represent the steps we can take towards environmental sustainability.  The first and second panel represents the tragedy of common acts; careless actions such as improper disposal of waste and littering. Simple actions such as discarding a cigarette may seem small and harmless, but millions commit the same action daily, truly damaging the environment. The third panel represents human involvement through education, action, and environmental engineering, which will improve conditions and hopefully prevent them as well. I will pursue Environmental Engineering to do my part in protecting the environment; luckily, I also have art to inform and educate others. The last panel presents what the future of coral reefs and oceans can be with everyone efforts in preserving it. Though it will take a lot of time and work, we should all have a goal of restoring our planet.

Katelyn Bilby

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

For this art piece, I was inspired by the will to live which the animals, birds, and ocean wildlife display. Humans on a daily basis are making it continuously harder for these creatures to live and thrive without realizing the depth of their actions. With this being said, my picture displays two pelicans: The one on the right symbolizes the pollution in the ocean, with the litter lined in its wings and the oil dripping from its mouth, and the one on the left symbolizes the pelican as a species and its fight to survive against the dangerous pollutions of its habitat.

Aylin Caballero

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

My piece was inspired from one of my last trips to South Padre Island, the neighboring beach to my city, Brownsville, Texas. While I was there, I couldn't help but feel utter disgust as my eyes took up all the trash that my fellow civilians left hidden under the sand or there upon the shore. It made me really upset that some people couldn't even take a few steps to just throw a water bottle in the cans provided. After seeing the mess on the shore, I couldn't help but think about all the trash that must have been lying in the water, or the trash that had already sunk and taken the ocean as its new home. Accompanying that thought came the one of “How much sea life has been affected by this, and why aren't we doing anything to change our ways and save our oceans?”  The idea of the water bottle being destroyed and setting free the ocean was created from this vivid picture I have in my head of a water bottle that was buried in the sand. In the trip to SPI, I was shocked to see the increasing number of bottles and plastics that were deserted there. I learned that not everybody knows how to clean up after themselves and that many people are selfish in caring about their lives only, and not even batting an eyelash towards the lives of the creatures who claim the beach as their home. Yet, I also learned that there are people like me in the world, people who pick up others’ trash, people who look after others and care for them. Those people are the change, and it's my dearest hope that there are people who want to be the change around the world and help save our oceans.

Nisha Chandra

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

As a person who frequently visits coastal beaches on vacations, ocean pollution makes me feel extremely disheartened.  As I reflect on nostalgic memories of taking pictures of starfish and other ocean creatures, I also worry about the future of our oceans due to the large amount of debris and pollutants constantly being dumped into them.  With this fear and uncertainty comes a sense of optimism and hope for oceans and marine life.  Despite the pollution that many oceans face, increasing EPA regulation of ocean debris and other similar legislative reforms can make it possible to create a positive impact on marine environments.  In order to reflect that in my piece of artwork, I depicted three EPA members cleaning up ocean debris in recyclable bags.  The contrast between the cleaner ocean environment on the left and the more polluted water on the right serves to represent how optimism towards ocean protection can create a huge difference for marine lifeforms and their environments.

Roselene Chen

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Throughout these few years, oil has become a major part in this changing world and its growing industries. Oil industries are usually placed near the ocean and there are often problems that leads to oil being released into the ocean. This oil is extremely toxic to the ocean life and can kill many of the marine animals. In this artwork, I have depicted many different types of animals that could be killed if they encounter any oil spills. The use of color emphasizes how life in the ocean is before they are all killed by the oil. The barrels at the bottom represent how humans have created these items to hold the oil in but they are of no use in the ocean and once released, they bring disaster to the marine life. Thus the name “Black Disaster” shows that the oil is toxic and can kill many animals. I was inspired to draw this as it represents how we treat animals in the ocean, we treat the ocean as if we can throw waste into the ocean. I hope I am able to show to people the dangers of oil spills and that the ocean is an extremely beautiful place and we should be able to protect it.
           

Rachel Cho

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

When people are about to drown, they usually scream and thrash with all their might to attract attention and stay afloat. But imagine that scenario, only with that person drowning in oil. As the black substance fills their lungs and slows their movement, screaming and flailing are no longer options. While they slowly sink beneath the gunk, their only hope is that somebody will come and rescue them. And that’s absolutely terrifying. It’s quite obvious that oil spills are nothing but bad for the environment, but I suppose that we all have to be reminded once more. Many residents of the ocean –and humans too- are suffering from these disastrous oil spills that cause severe water pollution. The mini scenario described above is a common happening to all aquatic animals around, and we must take responsibility for the cleanliness of our oceans. We too, depend on water, and it would be a slap in the face to Mother Nature to dirty what she has graciously provided us. So the next time we drink, we have to be thankful that we have a mouthful of fresh water, instead of a mouthful of pollution.

Caroline Dai

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

There is so much beauty in our water sources and I want to call to attention the dangers the aquatic ecosystem faces that can destroy that beauty. Water is a source of oxygen and a way of life for our society. From poles to tropical waters to small ponds, the water is home to a wide range of biodiversity and unique marine life. However, the pressing issue of pollution continues to foul this plethora of beauty. If something doesn’t change, all organisms that are dependent on its survival will perish under the disaster of our own making. I got the inspiration for my piece from a picture of a rotting albatross carcass. Inside its rib cage, there were the remains of a plastic bottle. The albatross, alluded to in The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, represents the burden that humanity bears. The adulteration of the ocean through garbage is our own ‘albatross hanging off our neck’. I wanted to use this imagery of an albatross--something pure and uncorrupted--being ‘strangled to death’ by soda can rings, to show the horrible consequences our actions have.

Douglas DeVito, Avery Rose Higgins, Isabella Neubauer

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Everyone knows Uncle Sam. Uncle Sam is the government. Uncle Sam wants you for the US Army. During the 1940s, when the poster was designed, soldiers were needed to fight in World War II, the global issue of the time. Currently, a big issue is the pollution and destruction of our environment. Much of our environmental science class this year has focused on humans impacting our world, so when we heard about this project and its theme of ocean pollution, we felt we had to participate. We felt particularly impacted by the question "What role do you play?" when considering our submission, and thus an idea was born. Everyone has their part to play in preventing our oceans from being polluted. As Uncle Sam would say, "I want you to stop ocean pollution!" Whether something simple, like choosing a paper bag instead of plastic at the grocery store, or something a little more difficult, like choosing to avoid plastic bottles, everything is important and everything helps. Many people have the tendency to think, "I'm just one person. Why should I recycle if no one else will?" Uncle Sam is here to say that we want you, personally, to help change the world. What one person can do doesn't seem like much, but it adds up. Everyone's contribution helps make the world a cleaner place to live in and enjoy.

Jacob Garza

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

The pollution in the ocean seems like an endless loop that keeps occurring time and time again. The ocean and its marine life are all in pain and are furious for humanity's recklessness. The ocean bleeds and cries for help, oil spills, plastic debris, and nuclear waste are all polluting the water, however there is still hope in our youth for a cleaner future. This piece represents a whirlpool of all the chaos mankind has brought to the ocean. It loops around showing recurring problems and effects of polluting the oceans. There’s no sugar coating this, marine animals are dying and will continue if we don’t stop making the same mistakes. The ocean life wants to escape this torture. The majestic whales that spring out of the ocean as a symbol of hope will soon be nothing but hollow bones of mankind's errors. The ocean we’ll hate people for bringing this plague. There is still hope for a cleaner future and it starts with our youth and the next generations that follow. The little girl is with her mother and his pointing out the chaos in the ocean. She is wearing white, a symbol of pureness and hope for the ocean. By coming together and fixing our errors mankind can restore peace in the oceans. It starts with our youth; set a good example that they can follow.

Eliza Goodwin

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

I have always loved art and the natural world around me. My concern for the earth and my ability to express myself through art is why I wanted to submit this piece. The ocean is important to the stability of our planet but the more I researched I discerned that the impacts we have on the ocean are not only inhuman but essentially an assault of the oceans and will eventually overturn the balance of a healthy planet. As I started to study the detrimental effects that pollution has on the oceans I came across a quote: “Why does wanting clean drinking water makes you an activist, and why does proposing to destroy water with chemicals not make you a terrorist.” This quote is what ultimately gave me the inspiration to paint this picture. It so clearly demonstrates the selfishness of human nature; taking and not give back. The goal of my painting was to switch the roles of the aquatic and land animals. The purpose and my hope was for people to switch their mindset so they are looking at this art from the viewpoint of marine life. This is why the horse, humans, and butterfly are all below the water; whereas, the octopus, cormorant, and fish are above. Hopefully, because of the switched roles, viewers can connect with the marine life and begin to see why aquatic pollution needs to stop. In order to create change we first have to care deeply.

Jasmine Haraburda

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

The ocean has held a very precious place in my heart ever since my childhood. This underwater realm and all of the amazing creatures that lived in it fascinated me. But at this very moment, the mesmerizing beauty of this marine biodiversity is being destroyed by climate change. Rising levels of carbon dioxide pollution from burning fossil fuels are increasing the acidity of ocean water, weakening coral reef structure. Coral bleaching also occurs when temperature change cause colorful algae living in symbiosis within coral to flee, leaving reefs a ghostly white and brown color. Half of the coral reefs on Earth have died over the last 30 years. Moreover, scientists predict that 90% of the world’s coral will be dead by 2050, which is worrisome since they are home to 25% of all marine species and support half a billion people. I created an arch of coral out of clay using glazes of minimal and dull color in order to imitate the haunting effects of coral bleaching due to global warming and reef destruction due to air pollution. However, I included hints of blues and greens as a reminder that there is still a glimmer of hope. If the world seriously cuts back on greenhouse gas emissions and scientists are successful in breeding heat-resistant breeds of coral, we may give many coral reefs a chance to recover.

Geonu Kim

2017 • High
Notable Submission

Sofia Jisoo Kim

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

My painting was drawn with the idea of portraying a message that says that we have to keep the ocean clean and a safe place for sea creatures. In my painting, I have drawn a couple dead fish to display what happens as a consequence of throwing trash into the ocean. As of 2016, it was estimated that about 270,000 tons of plastic were floating on the ocean’s surface. It was recorded that in merely one year, 32 million tons of plastic waste was produced, with only about nine percent being recycled. This means that most of the waste either goes to landfills that grow tremendously everyday or to the ocean. Just in the past forty years, 52% of Earth’s wildlife has disappeared. There are 700 different marine species that are currently endangered by the plastic waste in the ocean. Despite the amount of damage we have done to our ecosystem, we humans continue to waste and liter. There are thousands of sea creatures that die daily by ingesting trash that is harmful for their bodies, or get stuck on plastic and choke themselves. Oil spills have also been a huge problem in our world. There are so many big commercial ships that carry cargo around and fill the oceans with oil, preventing birds from flying and killing many sea creatures. I am hoping that this painting raises awareness about the amount of trash that is being dumped into the ocean daily. On the right side of my painting, I drew all the trash that has collected in the ocean in a cage. This cage is a barrier between the sea creatures and the harmful objects mindlessly being thrown into the ocean that harm them. This is a visual of what I wish would gradually happen in our oceans, that the trash will be separated from the sea creatures and eventually taken out of the oceans. The cage is locked by a lock and key, which the fish that is alive has the key to. This fish is locking all the trash away from his fellow fish who have already been harmed by the trash. As depicted by my painting, my hope for the future is that people around the world become of the serious problems caused by our littering and do something about it.

Seohyeon Lee

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

This picture depicts a sea bird running away from a dirty, polluted sea. The message of this drawing is that the seagulls want to escape from the ocean filled with rubbish and fly freely over the sky. In fact, the pollution was made from the negligence of human for the natural environment. In the picture, you can see a woman and man looking at different direction. It means they are turning away from the birds and fishes in the pollution. Birds cannot eat contaminated fish and can no longer live. The main character of this story is not only a seagull. Just as gulls cannot survive in water-polluted waters, so goes all life, including human being. The seagulls rising above the sky express the desire of all creatures who want to be free from ocean pollution.

Casside Parfait

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

I live in New Orleans, and the BP oil spill was a horrible firsthand experience. I have seen water pollution at extremes, dead fish and birds covered in oil, and the seafood industry suffer deeply. I was inspired to do something related to the devastating effects of the BP oil spill, but while researching, I came across another story. I learned about how my state bird, the Brown Pelican, was driven out of its home due to DDT runoff. The harmful insecticide was sprayed to kill bugs and it ran off into the water and affected the fish. The pelicans that consumed the fish were affected and when they laid eggs, the shells were weak and their offspring would die. The birds then left Louisiana and it took years to get the population up again. I was so motivated by the idea of the Brown Pelicans being gone, I centered my piece around that. I could not imagine waking up one day and having the beautiful bird gone from my own backyard. My piece depicts a bird, one I decided to make up. I thought by generalizing the species of bird, the viewer could better picture any type of bird in mind in a similar situation. The background is a collage of maps, cut up and reorganized into a latticed pattern. The misconstrued map symbolizes the bird’s struggle of leaving home, having to relocate to unknown lands, as well as disrupted migration patterns.

Vaibhavi Patankar

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Just off the coast of California lies a string of famous islands that are home to a great diversity of life.  Trips to the Santa Rosa Island Research Station with my school have instilled within me a great desire to promote the stewardship of natural resources and cultivate an appreciation for nature in its truest form. It dawned on me that we play a key role in promoting the welfare of our environment, and the beauty of Santa Rosa Island really opened my eyes to a world beyond the city life that I am accustomed to. The island has a rich and intriguing history and remarkable biodiversity, including its native species; the protection of these was a primary reason I dedicated time on the island to ensure the proper care of the ocean wildlife. The current restoration efforts on the island have showed me that there is hope in encouraging a society to change its current state of mind that doesn’t pay much regard to our ecosystems and their creatures. And with this in mind, I thought that drawing this picture, on the effects of oil spills, would be a great way to spread this message.

Oil spills are a hazardous outcome of industrialization and marine animals must pay the price. My artwork, “Helping Hands”, depicts gloved hands trying to rescue a seagull trapped in the oil. As the oil drips from the orange gloves and strikes the water below, puddles of oil are formed. Trapped within those puddles are a sea turtle and a sand crab, two of the many innocent victims of the oil spill.

Albert Pei

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Ever since I was little, I heard about how humans improved life and how fortunate we were compared to those who lived long ago. However, as I grew older and saw more of our world, I couldn’t help but see the lives we destroyed to improve our own. There was deforestation and mass extinction in many places. Then one day, I learned about oil spills. It was during 2010 when the BP oil well in the Gulf of Mexico released two hundred million gallons of oil into the ocean. Many pictures of oil covered seabirds and other wildlife filled news screens as they reported one of the biggest oil leaks in history. I’m a major advocate for the conservation of waterfowl. Seeing so many of them in such miserable state sparked both sadness for the victims and anger for the irresponsibility of the guilty party. As I learned more about ocean pollution, I felt increasingly responsible to help protect ocean wildlife. Our oceans cover the majority of the Earth’s crust. They provide us with an abundance of beauty and mystery. If we are to continue appreciating them and all that they give, we must protect them. Protect them for the sake of our planet and our future upon it.

Eli Smith

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

A disturbance on the water, creates a ripple effect going outward into a splash that then becomes a wave that can dictate what the future will become. This piece derived by the ripple effect in the natural world, and how little acts can lead to big consequences. I was not sure which issue of ocean pollution to tackle, so I decided to give a general lesson about what happens if we create a negative impact on the ocean. All events that harm the sea, to me, such as the BP Oil Spill in 2010, always make me angered and feel a sense of hopelessness. Man is the leading cause of ocean pollution. The choices we make, or actions we do, create ripple effects that will determine the future of our ocean and ourselves. Land-based sources like discharge, sewage, and pesticides account for 80% of marine pollution. But it doesn't have to be like this. The ripple effect can be made out of good decisions too. Positive acts can make a big difference. Be the person who creates positive ripple effects, for the future of our children.

Amanda Song

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Growing up in California’s Bay Area, I’ve been blessed by the grace of ocean waves and sparkling sea foam on many occasions. Hearing about ocean pollution and thinking about glistening waters suddenly being swallowed up by darkness is heart wrenching. Personally, this horrible feeling resembles a villain’s assault against an angel. This imagery is what I sought to express through my watercolor painting. The masked face, refined with poster paints, represents the oil industry, with drills crowning its forehead. The mask symbolizes the inhuman perspective that oil companies possess. Underneath this facade is a crying face, which illustrates how pollution’s damage eventually comes around and hurts us too. Crude oil spills are pictured as the mask’s hair, flowing from a corrupted source and reaching towards a crying girl. She represents the ocean and its anguish, symbolizing the ocean’s innocence and fresh elegance. Between the two lie a coastal city, which is caught in the crossfire of pollution; meaning, ocean contamination hurts aquatic and human environments. Lastly, in the center, a little boy raises his arm up in defiance of the monster that aims to ruin the ocean. This symbolizes the hope, power, and need for the next generation to rise up and put an end to the injustice and destruction oil pollution has forced upon Earth’s oceans.

Sarah Vargas

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Between 1947 and 1979, the Hudson River and its wildlife suffered from pollution produced by large companies along its banks. In recent years, marine biologists’ and conservationists’ dedicated efforts to clean up the river have prevailed. Increased sightings of humpback whales in New York Harbor just off the shores of Manhattan are a testament of improving conditions. I have sailed on the Hudson River for years and personally witnessed the gradual return of wildlife to the area. Yet, despite these advancements, I continue to helplessly watch litter float by on the river’s surface. My painting was created with the intention to remind people that there is still work to be done. In it, both a whale and a sinking ship are trapped in a bottle - a literal representation of pollution’s impact on wildlife as a result of human neglect. The sinking ship symbolizes human carelessness and the whale embodies the innocence of the marine life our negligence directly impacts. The sunrise in the background represents hope, inspired by the burgeoning humpback whale presence in the Hudson River, signifying cleaner water. The concept of hope is further explored in the piece because the whale, although trapped in litter, is swimming in clean water, a subtle homage to the success of Hudson River conservationists. My piece serves to remind people of the consequences of their actions on other living beings. Everyone must remain vigilant and active to keep all bodies of water clean and to protect the homes of marine life.  

Sophie Wei

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

On the 5th of October 2011, New Zealand experienced our worst environmental
disaster. The Rena, a cargo ship, tipped near the Bay of Plenty, and spilled 360
tonnes of fuel oil. Beaches were closed, and it is estimated 20,000 seabirds were affected. I was small when it happened, but I remember it was all anyone could talk about for weeks. In comparison to the amount of oil spilled in the Gulf of Mexico, it’s not a lot, but for us, clean green NZ, it was hard. We are small. We didn’t think it would happen here. In these situations, it is easy to blame the captain, the ship, the company. It is easy to point fingers and them cross them, and hope it won’t happen again. But our constant demand for more oil, for more product (and then our ignorance to how it gets to us) is killing our oceans. There were eight crates of hazardous material on that ship; But no one cared until it tipped. In my piece, I showed this with the black claws digging into the figure, which represents our greed. The flashing dollar and toxic signs in her eyes symbolise the danger that comes with our constant desire for more. It’s a simple metaphor, but it gets the message across: We are the problem!

Sophia Yang

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

My drawing expresses one type of ocean pollution, which is the “ghost net”. The ghost net is a specific type of plastic pollution resulting from fishing nets left or lost in the ocean by fishermen. These nets, often invisible in the dim light, are left tangled on rocky reefs or drifting in open sea and entangle fish, dolphin, sea turtles, dugongs, and other creatures. To represent the beauty of the ocean, I used watercolor as its transparent nature makes the drawing look like real water. The drawing is divided into two parts to compare two distinct environments. In the upper part, the entangled mermaid is struggling to tear the net apart to be free from the dirty water. These nets also keep other creatures from going anywhere as well. In the lower part, the nets split up gradually and disappear into the clean water. The beautiful fish, jellyfish, and mermaid’s tail show that they are in a healthy environment. The message I want to convey in my piece is to warn that people will one day become like that mermaid if we continue to be careless with fishing nets. Furthermore, the action of lacerating nets can be understood as a solution to the animals entangled in nets. In the lower part, which includes the mermaid’s tail, I chose to keep it clean to represent the hope that we can keep mermaids and all ocean animals free from ocean pollution.

Ziyi Zhou

2017 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

I would like to express my understanding of ocean pollution through participating in this marine pollution creative competition. One photograph gave me a lot of ideas and inspirations when I was doing research. In this photograph, a man is embracing a polluted fish. This action shows that human beings have realized that most polluted creatures in the ocean died from man-made pollution. I want to raise awareness of ocean conservation in order to protect our environment. I use the dried quail egg shell to represent ocean waste, large broken shells represent our destroyed marine system and curled paper art represents the ocean life under sea waves.

2017 Middle School Winners

Victor Li

2017 • Middle
Gold Award
reflection >

Here in California, Proposition 67, a ballot proposition that would ban stores from giving out single use plastic and paper bags and instead force them to charge customers for one, was passed. The effectiveness of this measure has been shown by statistics on the city of San Jose. According to Scientific American, a study revealed that plastic litter was reduced by 89% in the storm drains, 60% in the creeks, and 59% in the streets and neighborhoods, and use of reusable bags in the city had gone up 16-fold. Proof of how plastic sanctions work is also evident internationally. In Ireland, where a plastic bag tax was passed in 2002, plastic bag use went down by 94%. Driven away by the fee that came with the convenience of a plastic bag, people stopped using them, and this directly led to less plastic in the area, and ultimately the environment, around them.

My art explores the struggle between nature and plastic that is plaguing the oceans, and the solution that may help solve it. Up to 90% of seabirds have plastic in their stomachs, and they, along with all the sea creatures that are dying from it, are represented in the piece by an albatross, who are especially prone to eating plastic. The bird is flying towards a clean ocean, but is trapped by plastic in the form of bags and bottle caps. With a stomach filled with it, the animal lingers between life and death. Yet money, alluding to plastic tax, is slowly, yet surely, saving it, by turning the plastic into food, and the bones into flesh and feather, acting out the positive effect that plastic levies can have on oceans and their residents.

As a metaphor for using my proposed method of plastic taxes, which can be implemented on other forms of plastic such as utensils and water bottles to save our oceans, my art is expressing a concept that I want people to consider as a realistic way to help get rid of plastic pollution.

Becky Kim

2017 • Middle
Silver Award
reflection >

Our ocean is facing a huge challenge right now, with all the oil leakage from factories all over the world, and all the trash that billions of people threw away. Most people do not know about the seriousness of our ocean dying as time goes by. If we do not come up with the proper solution, our sea is going to rot away and we are going to face huge consequences. For our future, a solution for polluted waters and ocean trash would be having a machine that cleans out the ocean all the time. These machines would filter out all the oil leakage in the water, and pick up all the plastic trash that is threatening the fish. If we start now, the change we can do to the ocean would be tremendous. We are doing this for future generations.

Sergiy Rudik

2017 • Middle
Silver Award
reflection >

Sea and costal pollution is the main problem of the world ocean. Lots of marine creatures are dying and this rate is increasing on daily basis. At the World Economic Forum, representatives have claimed that according to their calculations plastic garbage will exceed the number of fish in the sea by 2050. So, I have decided to take part in this competition and help to deal with the problem concerning ocean pollution.

Moreover, I am very inspired by the topic of this project and realize all the responsibilities that will lie on me during this participation. I also understand the importance of this project as long as it is aimed at helping our planet to be healthy.

Aleesha Haq

2017 • Middle
Bronze Award
reflection >

The human attack on the environment keeps me awake at night. I find it distasteful that we do not seem to care about how we discard our waste and let it affect the marine environment. Our lazy or humanly expedient ways has led to litter in the seas and it has a devastating effect on marine life. The waste that are collected in the waters lead to some marine animals eating material they cannot digest, get poisoned or contaminated by the overwhelming pollution. These sea animals just can’t seem to fight back the relentless assault of waste. This prompted me to raise the level of awareness of the harm we are causing to these sea creatures. I hope the people I know or interact with can pass the message eventually to the real culprits out there to abstain from their neglectful ways.

This art piece simple messages that our neglectful ways cause damage to innocent animals. We do not see it and that is why I drew waste and trash within the shape of the sea creature to show that it has become second nature to us humans. The wastes are coloured in black and white format to make it stand out but send the meaning that it does not fit the sea creature. It is a signal to us humans to make things right.

Save Gaia and Stop the War.

Soobin Sung

2017 • Middle
Bronze Award
reflection >

As a young student, I strongly desire that people to understand the extreme level of marine pollution, which will be affecting me and countless other children mercilessly in the close future. In order to demonstrate and deliver this message, I chose an ink painting that only consists of different shades of black, other than shades of beautiful deep blue or emerald. This represents the contaminated ocean water and decaying ecosystems. Additionally, I added a face as the background to my art work. I aimed for the goal that different people may interpret it in different ways. For instance, one could say the face symbolises the shameless people that are responsible for the abuse towards the ocean. Others could say it represents Mother Nature that is losing its pride from being awfully anemic and rancid. Lastly, the ink that has escaped from the outline of the face illustrates the fact that marine pollution is and will significantly affect other natural habitats and ecosystems other than simply the ocean.

JieJie Yuan

2017 • Middle
Bronze Award

Sherry Chen

2017 • Middle
Pearl Award
reflection >

The chance of oil spills increases as people use cruises more. Oil spills can really damage the ocean and also significantly damage sea creatures’ natural habitat. People try to fix them with many different ways such as burning, collecting and gelling oil and so on. However, oil spills will not be completely fixed. Many sea creatures die due to oil spills. Oil wrap around sea birds’ wings and they soon lose their body temperature. Imagine if the sea creatures were doing this to humans. Getting wrapped up by oil and dying.

In this artwork, I present humans building fancy modern buildings, which damages the ocean. Oil inside the ocean grabs the sea creatures as they try to escape. The corals were damaged. Sea creatures want a nice home. No pollution and a better environment must be achieved.

Rachel Kim

2017 • Middle
Pearl Award

Kayla Jang

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

My artwork represents the ocean being polluted with objects that we people throw away into the waters. This causes many problems like killing our food source or screwing up the environment for other creatures. The most thing that hurts the environment are oil spills. The oil spills are created by us and is already hard enough to clean it. It spreads in a massive area and takes years to clean up. During those times, fish are dying and the water sources are getting polluted. The fish in my piece have the look of sorrow in their face. All the fish on the ground are dead shown by the fish skeleton heads. Right now, I see that the crisis of the ocean is going to become the crisis of our future if we don’t try to stop this uncontrollable pollution to the ocean.

William Kim

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Oil pollution. Debris. Acidification. These are all aspects of ocean pollution, and are all big problems for marine life, but there’s one thing that’s forgotten. When we think of ocean pollution, we think about oil spills, sewage, debris, but not invasive species. Invasive species are animals or plants that are carried by man to a place they should not be. They are a growing problem for the marine ecosystem, but are constantly ignored and unmentioned, and many of us may have added to the problem. One example of an invasive species is the lionfish. The lionfish, an aggressive fish that is natively found in the Indo-Pacific region, is now causing a huge problem by devouring all the prey fish in the Caribbean Sea and in the East Coast of the U.S.

The lionfish in my drawing is depicted throwing up fish bones and other things like trash and mammal bones. The bones show how much fish are being eaten, and the size of the lionfish depicts how many of them are in the ocean. I also added a bit of trash to depict marine debris, and a few bones of bigger animals to exaggerate the scene. I hope that my drawing will inspire people to act on invasive species.

Kate Lee

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

As we know, the Earth is being heavily polluted every day. With all this waste in the ocean, sea and land animals will be affected and eventually endanger them. My art piece depicts two sides of the effect of waste: one part where we humans produce waste and the other where the innocent animals are affected due to our polluting actions. I included birds and a turtle to show a few of the many animals that are endangered by our waste. The trash and the cans in my picture depict the pollution that exists in the sea, which crucially imperils turtles who get caught in fishing nets, and to certain extent, consume our waste. I purposely used different colors for the air to signify the deterioration of our air quality. I made it so that the birds in my painting are in terror and are in search of fresher, cleaner air, which naturally does not exist in our environment anymore due to our arrogant needs. I want people to see my artwork and understand the damage that we are continuously producing. Although we may not notice the difference, the plants, animals, and everything around do.

 

Michelle Li & Brandy Zhang

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Did you know that by 2050, the ocean will contain more plastic in it than fish? The ocean may be enduring for now, but if people continue what they’re doing now, we may not even be able to find a bit of pure and clean ocean water. We can't control the habits of others, but we surely can control ourselves, and how we affect our ocean community.

The garbage in our art piece is what we are currently doing to our ocean. The whale has become a cut-out, because it embraces the idea that it has gone to a better place; replaced by a photo, we can see the correct action we should take in this type of situation. If we continue to act as we have, our entire environment will be ruined and polluted so horribly. It will be so unbearable, so intolerable, that all the good memories would be forgotten by mankind before we know it.

Fiona Luo

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

During a recent school field trip to San Francisco, a sudden gust of wind blew my friend’s Ziploc bag away, in the direction of the ocean. When I pointed this out, my classmate replied: “Pollution is such a big problem that one plastic bag won’t make a difference.” Having a negative outlook towards pollution, I decided, will not help us at all. In order to make progress in any task, we must first adopt a positive outlook.

My artwork, created with color pencil, expresses the relationship between optimism and result. The people in the center, whose heads are full of clean water and living fish, represent those who view our ocean’s future positively. Those who have a positive outlook of our future ocean, whose heads are filledwith beliefs that the ocean can improve, consequently endeavor to tidy and clean the beach, as can be seen with the cleaning supplies they hold. Their actions, which are fueled by hope, then impact their environment directly. This can be seen in the unpolluted ocean in the background.

However, those on the left and right sides, whose heads are filled with negative opinions about the future ocean, do not take action, and as a result, their environment deteriorates.

I believe the future of our oceans is in our hands. I hope that through my artwork, I will help my audience realize that our future ocean can still improve, and that each individual’s perspective will make a big difference.

Irene Oh

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Approximately 1.4 billion pounds of trash is added every year to our ocean. If this continues, piles of trash will replace our continents and gallons of oil will replace our sea.

I try to explain the effect of ocean pollution through my artwork. My artwork consists of blue and gray tones. Mostly it's blue to represent the ocean color. The gray color represents the dullness the sea creatures show. My artwork is focused on a peculiar mermaid. She represents the safe part of the ocean where the fish live because she is here to protect the sea creatures. The marine mermaid embraces a giant turtle. Holding it with her hands symbolically, represents hope and our humanity to protect the marine life. There are other creatures affected by the pollution too. However, the mermaid is affected the most because all she can do is to promise to protect her friends from the trash damaging her home.

Ocean pollution is still a big problem today. We can make a huge difference if we spread the news, help clean up the piles, and not litter. Even though the amount of trash seems endless, even cleaning up one piece of trash can still make a big difference. The word “ocean” defines “a very large expanse of sea” not a very large expanse of trash. We started this and we have the responsibility to end it. We are connected to the ocean. If the ocean turns into trash we will too.

Ari Su

2017 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Once, in the Boston harbor, I went whale watching, sailing so far out that the bustling city line drowned into the water. I remember seeing, as the boat rocked back and forth, the fins of playful dolphins and the humps of whales. And I can recall pondering if, by the finale of my life, I could see such creatures again. The thought that I could not crushed my childish wonder.

With the increase of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from human production, the dissolution of CO2 in the ocean, a massive carbon sink, raises the pH of the water, causing the bleaching of vibrant corals, the demise of marine wildlife, and the disruption of complex migratory patterns. The phenomenon we call acidification, an invisible plague, is seeping through the cracks.

It is crucial that we realize that the ocean is a key component of the world; harm to the world is harm to the ocean and harm to the ocean is harm to the world. Ingenuity took us into age of climate change and only ingenuity will take us out. Now, with the possibility of cheaper, efficient, renewable energies, such as solar, wind, and fusion, we can diminish the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and reduce global warming and acidification. When our world has warmed, when our oceans have acidified, we search together, unyielding, over despair, with only the innovation and compassion of humanity as our deep hope.

Bianca Gegea

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Middle of the ocean. Excessive oil. Radioactive waste. Excessive plastic and small pieces of plastic. Year 2027. This is the reality that we face daily. People have started the cleaning process. The people's turn has changed when every person took care of the waste he was throwing before he invaded where he was going. Then, with so much plastic, they quickly set up businesses that cut small pieces and reuse it. Again and again. So not only has it taken an unexpected turn, but they all wanted to use biodegradable products. People have felt the need for cleanliness and have forgotten about this evil. At the top they cleaned the beaches, from the jungle to the North Pole. Everywhere needs to be clean. The bag represents the years of excessive pollution suffered by the sea and the oceans. The arms hold the hope: the species that are now protected. They are trying to get used to changing and accommodating themselves in the new environment now being cleansed. My work is rather symbolic. If we do not stop now from being selfish and destroying the biodiversity of the wonderful oceans, we will all suffer. At least, we hope that each of us will manage to head to protect the environment and the oceans.

Rachel Jiang

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

My artwork is about how nuclear waste or nuclear power plants are polluting the ocean. The reason why I didn’t make the underwater ocean dirty is because when people see the ocean, they only see the outside image and they believe everything is alright even though nuclear power plants are harming our world little by little. Thus, I drew a dolphin slowly turning into waste, but because a human cared about these poor animals, she showed her affection towards this subject and slowly turned the dolphin back to normal. If you look closely, the nuclear power plant is actually a nose that is sucking in the black liquid. This resembles how we as humans might not know it, but the dangerous pollution emitted from the nuclear waste is also going to our nose. We need to be aware for the ocean and for our human health.

Irene Raeeun Kim

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

On August 3, 1979 during a tropical storm in the Caribbean, the SS Atlantic Empress, a Greek oil tanker, collided with the Aegean Captain, releasing approximately 287,000 tons of oil into the Caribbean Sea. It is the biggest oil spill caused by a tanker to this day. Although much attention from this event was taken away by the massive Ixtoc I oil spill, the oil from the Atlantic Empress affected marine life greatly.

My artwork represents human ignorance and shows how our mistakes can negatively affect the environment. The fireworks and flashy lights represent how we are sitting around going on vacations and enjoying our life ignoring all the bad around us. As we are ignoring these problems, more ocean spills are happening and more debris is being swept into the oceans. The ships are luxurious cruise ships showing how we are able to sail the same polluted waters on fancy boats. Under the surface, the boats are shown leaking massive amounts of oil into the ocean and plastic can be found at the bottom of the sea. Our ignorance on these problems is what prevents us from preventing the ocean pollution. My hope is that this artwork will be able to bring attention to oil spills and ocean debris. Since we are the ones that caused this problem, we have to be the ones to fix it. If we all face the problem, I believe that we can fix it.

Carol Liang

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Since the year 1800, there has been more and more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere each year. Carbon dioxide has been mostly caused by human activities like burning fossil fuels. And when some of the carbon dioxide released in the atmosphere dissolves into water, it can cause ocean acidification. Because of acidification, shells and corals corrode and break, which can cause the deaths of lots of fish because it’s their food and habitat.

These events are what inspired me to create my drawing “Reflection of The Time”. Half of the side of the hourglass is good and clean and the other half side is bad and dirty. Each side was also divided into ocean and earth. This is because ocean acidification happens in the ocean, but releasing carbon dioxide happens on earth and that is why the ocean and earth are both shown on each side. This drawing shows how we wish the world is and how the world might change to be years later.

Cynthia Liu

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Ocean pollution is a terrible thing. It makes me feel very disgusted and guilty. One of the worst ones is marine debris and plastic pollution, because this a form of pollution that is very directly connected to human carelessness, and a form of pollution that if we tried, could be solved. According to the National Academy of Sciences, in 1975, we dumped about 14 billion pounds of garbage into the ocean. Also, according to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, up to 1 million seabirds and 100,000 marine animals die each year from eating plastic. Seeing all of the pictures of turtles that grow around plastic and the seas of dead fish, really makes me feel like I should be doing something to help. I really hope to spread the word about ocean pollution even more using my artwork. In my artwork, I drew an aquarium, which represents the ocean, and the many problems within because of pollution. There’s a girl on the side who is grieving for the animals killed by human neglect. There are two hands by the top that are trying help by cleaning out the trash. I hope by using my artwork, I can help the ocean become cleaner and better for all the marine life.

Oksana Muzychenko

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Here in Ukraine, in biology classes, on TV, everywhere we hear a lot about ocean pollution. Yet, we got used to hearing about this problem so much that we do not really notice it. It seems like if it is somewhere far away and that it will solve itself.  It has to be said, that in my dear country this problem is really urgent. People throw huge piles of litter everywhere and in water as well. My father says that it is because we do not have any working penalty charges. But I think that is not the lack of penalty, but the lack of awareness. It is worth saying that my parents care about it more than lots of other people. That is why, when we rest somewhere on the river banks, my family and I always take bags to clean the place after other people. We leave it cleaner than it was before us. This is a small step, but if everyone would do that, ocean would become a lot cleaner. As it is said, “Think globally, act locally”. Yet in all honesty, I use a lot of water everyday relentlessly and rarely think about its pollution or economy, when I am at home. This contest is the chance for me to start acting more consciously. One of my small achievements is that now I almost never use plastic bags and carry everything in my cloth bag. I also carry a reusable water bottle with me. I hope that there will be more changes in my life.

I was inspired by Botticelli, his painting “Birth of Venus”. It is clean and magnificent, yet in my work I was trying to show a lot of rubbish that is spoiling it, as well as it spoils our planet.

Minki Shin

2017 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

As I started to draw this, I thought about all the waste that is going into our nation’s landfills, and into the ocean. Every year, people waste and litter anything they want into the drains or just on the streets. The amount of harm they are doing to the environment is not humane. All of this trash will go down into the drains, and into the ocean. This is not only hurting the marine or land animals, but also hurting ourselves too. By littering, it is polluting the environment and even making trash piles in the ocean, land, and even space. Yes, Space Debris is when some of our trash and waste gets into space. That’s why I want to show people, the harm they are causing if they just go around, littering on the streets or anywhere they like.

2016 High School Winners

Antonella Masini

2016 • High
Gold Award
reflection >

Jennifer Tsogtsaikhan

2016 • High
Gold Award
reflection >

Angelika Kołodziej

2016 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Luyi Song

2016 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Jessica Yang

2016 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Alyssa Plese

2016 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Jessica Xia

2016 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Ryann Bailey

2016 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

Bailey Fleck

2016 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

Taein Gu

2016 • High
Pearl Award
reflection >

Theresa Ho

2016 • High
Pearl Award

Raymond Banke

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Anais Beninger

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Chloe Boetcher

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Caitlin Chen

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Hayun Chong

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Ellory Doyle

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jiyoon Moon

2016 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Mary Dvorsky

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Ely German

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Tessa Hall

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Immy McAndrew

2016 • High
Honorable Mention

Jose Robles

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Keren Sagastume

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Cindy Sun

2016 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Lauren Fuller

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Cindy Ha

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Marion Hopkinson

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Janine Liu

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Yuqian Ma

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Gio Rath

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Hannah Sarakinsky

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Gerald Sastra

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Megan Vetter

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Sayo Watanabe

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Rachel Yoon

2016 • High
Notable Submission
reflection >

Grace Djakic

2016 • High
Impact Award
reflection >

Miranda Klein & Ben Peverall

2016 • High
Impact Award
reflection >

Karissa Liu

2016 • High
Impact Award
reflection >

Sujal Manohar

2016 • High
Impact Award
reflection >

Dana Musso

2016 • High
Impact Award
reflection >

2016 Middle School Winners

Tammy Feng

2016 • Middle
Gold Award
reflection >
 

Maxwell Sagermann

2016 • Middle
Gold Award
reflection >
 

Lily Deng

2016 • Middle
Silver Award
reflection >

Bianca Pozzi

2016 • Middle
Silver Award
reflection >

Caleb Huang

2016 • Middle
Bronze Award
reflection >

Michelle Hui

2016 • Middle
Bronze Award
reflection >

Lynne Yoon

2016 • Middle
Bronze Award
reflection >

Madeleine Alexander

2016 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Daumoney Liu

2016 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Cristina Maria Simion

2016 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jessica Zhu

2016 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jane Anderson-Schmitt

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Cooper Bodeo-Lomicky

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Victoria Cheng

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

 

Allison Guo

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Rachel Jang

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Hillary Kim

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Timothy Kim

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Erica Lim

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Rachel Maughan

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jane Oh

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Junwoo Park

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Justin Park

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Tiffany Rhee

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jayne Steele

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Emily Wang

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Lucy Zhang

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Nicole Zhu

2016 • Middle
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Fremont Middle School Enviro Club

Estevan Arenas
Jennifer Davila
Alexis Pita
Ixtlazily Ramirez
Hector Tostado

2016 • Middle
FTBS Advocacy Prize
reflection >

2015 High School Winners

Timothy Li

2015 • High
Gold Award
reflection >
 

Jonathan Barrera

2015 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Se Yeon Choi

2015 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Vyusti Kumaar

2015 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Joyce Wang

2015 • High
Silver Award
reflection >

Nadja Garacic

2015 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Michelle Huang

2015 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Melannie Johnson

2015 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Alexandra Shaulis

2015 • High
Bronze Award
reflection >

Hyeonwoo Cho

2015 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Lauren Gabourel

2015 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Emily Kaplin

2015 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Brenna Litynski

2015 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Lyvia Yan

2015 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention
reflection >

Gerson Adame

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Margaux Armfield

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Amelia Bianchi

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Alannah Dubois

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Mary Dvorsky

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Eliezer Garcia

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Tristan Ketterer

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Grace Kim

2015 • High
Honorable Mention

Jisung Ko

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Caroline Kubzansky

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Hanna Lara

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >


Hyunjin Lee

2015 • High
Honorable Mention

Sophie Lee

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Sergey Levchenko

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Grace (Hyein) Park

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Hesu Song

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Jhen Yueh

2015 • High
Honorable Mention

Artology

Kimberly A.
Naomi B.
Jasmine C.
Fatima N.
Alejandra G.
Jonathan H.
Phuong H.
Fausto G.
Antony A.
Leonardo C.
Antonio C.
Arnulfo S.
Joshua A.
Yvette G.
Marco M.
Nigel T.
Jennifer C.
Charlie R.
Hana S.
Sinai R.
Jovanny H.
Deanna Hotchner, coordinator
Jessie Schwartz, coordinator

2015 • High
Honorable Mention
reflection >

Donovan DeCuire & Joshua Lee

2015 • High
Special STEAM Award
reflection >

Emily Kaplin

2015 • High
Atlantic White Shark Conservancy Award
reflection >

2015 Middle School Winners

Doyeon (Donna) Kim

2015 • Middle
Gold Award

Roselene Chen

2015 • Middle
Silver Award

Kacey M Kim

2015 • Middle
Silver Award

Kristy Lee

2015 • Middle
Silver Award

Cooper Bodeo-Lomicky

2015 • Middle
Bronze Award

Savannah Meyer

2015 • Middle
Bronze Award

Taha Sihorwala

2015 • Middle
Bronze Award

Jennifer Yang

2015 • Middle
Bronze Award

Diane Choi

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Kaydee Hong

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Sarah Arim Kong

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Eric Lin

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Kaitlyn Rawlings

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Cindy Tsou

2015 • Middle
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Madeline Bain

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Christina Chen

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Caitlin Chen

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Kayla Kim

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Isabella Kwon

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Grace Nix

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

Luke Wabro

2015 • Middle
Honorable Mention

2014 High School Winners

Dafne Murillo

2014 • High
Gold Award

Juwan Mayes

2014 • High
Silver Award

Katharine Wu

2014 • High
Silver Award

Alexandra Shaulis

2014 • High
Bronze Award

Ming Wang

2014 • High
Bronze Award

Sarah Bobbe

2014 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Courtney Fucaloro

2014 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention, Judges' Pick

Lexie Peru

2014 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Hyun Sung

2014 • High
Distinguished Honorable Mention

Johanna Poedubicky

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Kristof Turzo

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Michelle Huang

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Alyssa DeSilva

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Emma Beightol

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Athina Herrera

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Julia Ebert

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Eliezer Garcia

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Tortuga Marinas Group

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Emma Spies

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Benjamin Lee

2014 • High
Honorable Mention

Claire Kincaid

2014 • High
Judges' Pick

Geneva Martinez

2014 • High
Judges' Pick

Hallie Ferguson

2014 • High
Judges' Pick